Thursday, January 18, 2018

A Brutalist-Inspired Collection by SAVVY Studio and Pablo Limón Design Office

A Brutalist-Inspired Collection by SAVVY Studio and Pablo Limón Design Office

Debuted at Mexico Design Week 2017, the PL+VV collection is a collaboration between SAVVY Studio and Pablo Limón Design Office that consists of a series of experimental furniture, objects and lighting. It’s a collection created from years of inter-studio collaborations with partners like Candela, an illumination studio, and Más, a design studio specializing in concrete products. By revisiting these past collections, the team is able to reexamine and refine the design process as well as incorporate new elements. The collection is inspired by Brutalist architecture and incorporates a wide variety of materials including fiberglass, colored resin, stainless steel, basalt stone, reinforced concrete, borosilicate glass, vinyl, leather, velvet, oak wood, steel, tezontle stone and molder polyurethane.

To learn more about each piece, visit PLDO.

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Williamsburg Combination by General Assembly

Williamsburg Combination by General Assembly

Williamsburg Combination is a renovation project located in Brooklyn, New York, designed by General Assembly. A young family wanted the designers to help combine two apartments into one, and create a space that would feel more like a home than a New York City apartment.

Through the combination of apartments, the designers were able to think through how to maximize natural light while creating an airy and comfortable space. The programs were re-arranged, and the living room was opened up toward the rear patio while the designers drastically enlarged the kitchen area on the ground floor.

Throughout the renovation, the designers were conscientious in bringing in local designers to fill the space. As a result, light fixtures, wallpaper, and tiles were all made by local designers. As described by General Assembly, the final result was a clean, open space dotted with moments of design that are particular to this family and their neighborhood.

Photography by Dora Somosi.

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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Style Icons that Prove Glasses Aren’t Geeky by BrandsExclusive

Feeling flat about your frames? Turn this essential into your favourite accessory with inspiration from these style icons. By honing the art of laid-back cool, and flamboyant character, these style icons prove glasses are always a good thing when it comes to fashion.

Iris Apfel
“More is more and less is a bore.” Keeping true to her fashion bible, Iris Apfel has hit the streets of New York for the last eight decades with a powerful maximalist style. The interior and fashion designer is rarely seen without her signature oversized glasses, and as a self-professed flea-market freak, she’s a collector of unique frames with the motto: the bigger the better!

“If you have to wear glasses, wear glasses!” Iris Apfel

John Lennon
The iconic musician and song writer was a late bloomer when it came to embracing this fashion accessory. So much so he only wore his glasses in private, often hitting the stage with the front row a blur! When he finally came ‘round to the idea of sporting his round-rimmed glasses out in the open, they soon became a part of his trademark image, propelling him to global “style icons” status.

Styling tip: round-rimmed glasses soften angular features.

Elton John
With over 250,000 pairs of glasses in a separate walk-in wardrobe, we can safely say: Elton John is obsessed! The singer, musician, and composer has been sporting quirky specs throughout his career, making the most of his short-sightedness with frames in flamboyant colours and shapes. With a more reserved approach to his eyewear picks these days, we can only hope there’s a special shrine in the wardrobe for his infamous windshield wiper glasses.

style icons
Dita Von Teese
Elegance and sophistication goes hand in hand with Dita Von Teese’s vintage glamour look. The Queen of Burlesque is no stranger to best-dressed lists, flaunting her inspired flash-back style with classic cat-eye frames the icing on the cake. Her signature eyewear shape, which oozes 50s and 60s flair, is a perfect fit for those with a heart-shaped face.

Diane Keaton
Taking the reins from Katherine Hepburn, Diane Keaton has championed the pant suit on the red carpet, making it her own with accessories such as men’s ties and fedoras that boast androgynous appeal. This quiet confidence for accessorising is ever-present in her choice of eyewear, too. Playing with a varied range of frames over the years – round, rectangle, and oversized – she’s mastered the perfect finish to her look.

Main photo by Thomas Whiteside

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Our Top 5 Cringe-Worthy 90s Hairstyles by BrandsExclusive

Ah the 90s. Most commonly described as a decade packed full of epic fashion fails. If you need a little reminding; think hyper colour t-shirts, double denim, cargo pants, and anything-high vis, really. Yeah, you know you’re guilty of some of these a-grade blunders. They don’t just stop there. The 90s were also defined by unapologetic hairstyles that, even to this day induce severe teeth grinding. Like… if history repeats itself, we’re all in big trouble.

But for now, take a ~chill pill~ and pop the popcorn because we’re revisiting the worst, most cringe-worthy hairstyles of the 90s. Sorry in advance for the traumatic flashbacks.

Hair Crimping

The hair philosophy of the 80s was definitely “the bigger the better,” so when it began to fade out in the early 90s, some nostalgic nincompoop tried to bring it back with crimping. While it may have seemed like a good idea at the time, looking back, crimping should’ve been well cemented in the 80s. Who wants to look like the aftermath of a severe electric shock?


Image via Pinterest

Frosted Blonde Tips
We can’t help but point a reluctant finger at our classic 90s boy bands for this one. Most men like to deny that this fad ever happened, and we can see why. It kind of looks like a porcupine-ish ‘do with rapid ice blonde highlights.


Image via Pinterest

Butterfly Clips
Butterfly clips came in transparent, matte, metallic or glitter finishes and were widely popular in the 90s – despite being hideously unflattering. They were mainly used to keep your hair out of your eyes, but always looked like some kind of butterfly orgy taking place atop your head.


Image via Pinterest

2-Minute Noodle Hair
We’ll say it — the ubiquitous ramen noodle hair trend was by far the worst hairstyle of all time for men. Do you style it or do you pick at it with chopsticks? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Justin Timberlake donned this look in the 90s, and “Bye Bye Bye” (sorry, we had to) it went by the year 2000.


Image via Pinterest

The Rachel
No look has quite so single-handedly defined an entire decade like The Rachel has. Every woman in the mid-90s showed up to their local salons clutching magazine clippings of Rachel Green’s iconic do. A hairstyle of epic proportions, there was nothing subtle or remotely natural about those unforgivable shaggy layers or blinding highlights.

While Jen’s signature look didn’t take off in the naughties (hairdressers of the 90s can rejoice!), the Internet will never forget.


Image via Pinterest

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The Shadow Photographs of Wang Ningde

The Shadow Photographs of Wang Ningde

The “photographs” of Wang Ningde are pure light, or more accurately, pure shadow. Each is created from over a thousand rectangular film transparencies attached horizontally, like rows of tiny awnings. Each cell drops a shadow beneath, forming a complete work of art that is both sculptural and intangible.

Thicket No 4, 2017

Currently working and living in Beijing, Ningde is presenting 10 of these medium-defying works in a show titled “Form of Light” at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York through February 17th. And it’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen.

Polarized Could No. 5, 2017

Polarized Could No. 5, 2017 (detail)

Polarized Could No. 5, 2017 (detail)

On closer inspection, these are far more complex than they first appear. The rows of film extend at different distances depending on their height. For example the top row is a full 1 inch deep, where the bottom row extends less than half of that (about 3/8 of an inch).

Installation – Wang Ningde at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery

Color Filter for a Utopian Sky No. 21, 2017 (detail)

The reason for the depth-difference has everything to do with the light source. Every piece begins with a standard photograph that is fed into a computer. Custom software divides each image into “bricks” AND calculates the degree of compression for each cell based on the angle of light. With a single light source, the angle of light will be slightly different at the top than at the bottom, so every row must be distorted differently to compensate, and result in equal-height, non-distorted image-shadows.

Once the computer does its work, the result is printed on clear film transparency, before the labor-intensive process of hand-cutting and hand-assembling the finished works.

Installation – Wang Ningde at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery

Thicket No 4, 2017 (detail)

The images themselves are well considered – each playing with the qualities of this particular method. “Thicket No. 4” (above) for example, is an image of sunlight hitting the top of leaves. But when standing close, it mimics the effect of light filtering from a forest canopy. The viewer is both inside and outside the forest simultaneously.

Water Ripples, 2017

Water Ripples, 2017 (detail)

“Water Ripples” is an image of light hitting the surface of water, but standing close, the light mimics the sensation of swimming underwater.

The gallery lighting is incredibly precise, with no skylights or windows, but I heard that the pieces take on a new effect with the addition of natural light. Works like “Polarized Cloud No 5” and the “Utopian Sky’s”, will fluctuate and shift with real passing clouds and different times of day.

Color Filter for a Utopian Sky No. 21, 2017

Thicket No. 5, 6, and 7, 2017

Thicket No. 5, 6, and 7, 2017 (detail)

Thicket No. 7, 2017 (detail)

Ningle’s work is a hybrid of mediums – it’s simultaneously photography, sculpture, and perhaps even film. It’s also the combination of meticulous hand-work and mathematical computer-precision. But standing in front of them, all I really notice is the magical quality of color in a photograph made of pure light.

Color Filter for a Utopian Sky No. 9, 2014

What: Wang Ningde: Form of Light
Where: Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, 505 W 24th St, New York, NY
When: January 11 – February 17, 2018

All images photographed by the author, David Behringer.

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